About your Search

20121202
20121210
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
, secretary of state hillary clinton is coming to the defense of u.n. ambassador susan rice, calling her a stalwart colleague. rice is seen as a top pick to succeed clinton in the state department, but is under attack by republicans who accuse her of misleading the public in the aftermath of the september 11th attacks at the u.s. consulate in benghazi. >> and it's important to remember what susan said was based on the information that had been given to every senior official in our administration, and she made very clear in her appearances that the information was subject to change as more facts were gathered and analyzed by the intelligence community. and look, as is often the case, our understanding evolved over time. and we've done our best to keep the american people and the congress informed. that was her goal, that was her mission and she should not be criticized for doing exactly that. >> that, of course, comes in direct conflict with what general david petraeus, the director of the cia, told the committee in the senate where he said they knew immediately after the attack, the next
of traditional marriage between one man and one woman say, quote: since president bill clinton signed doma into law, 30 states have followed suit by incorporating the definition of marriage into their constitutions. voters in these states will not accept an activist court redefining our most fundamental social institution. arguments on both cases are likely to be in march and rules likely in june. shep? >> shepard: we got another announcement from the supreme court today. it's going to take up another case that really could effect what we all pay for prescription drugs. >> right. this is about the battle between more expensive brand name drugs and cheaper generic drugs. some of the brand name companies pay the generic drug makers to keep cheaper drugs off store counters which some estimates say cost consumers $3.5 billion a year in higher drug costs. the supreme court will determine if this practice illegally reduce competition. shep? >> shepard: molly henneberg in washington tonight. thanks. we got some good news on the economy today. really competing signs. it's not all good. first the g
tax rates will revert to higher clinton-era leveles, a 2% payroll tax cut will expire, and long-term unemployment benefits will dry up for over two million americans who have been out of work for six months or more. on friday boehner did not rule out a compromise on a tax hike for top earners, somewhere between today's 35% and of rate and the clinton-era's throan.6%. >> there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. >> reporter: even if the two sides are making progress behind the scenes, no one expects them to admit it until the last minute. the office of management and budget has asked all federal agencies to produce detailed listes of possible cuts just in case there's no deal maurice. >> dubois: nancy cordes, thank you. one of the brightest spots in the u.s. economy is car sales. 1.1 million cars and trucks were sold last month, up 15% or last year. john blackstone reportes, while americans are spending more money on cars they're demanding vehicles vehicles that cost them less at the pump. >> reporter: this year's l.a. auto s
signs from hillary clinton that running for president could be in her future. [ woman ] too weak. wears off. [ female announcer ] stop searching and start repairing. eucerin professional repair moisturizes while actually repairing very dry skin. the end of trial and error has arrived. try a free sample at eucerinus.com. military families face, we understand. at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. >>> some new details surrounding the tragic turn of the royal radio hoax. right now a memorial grows for the nurse who took the prank call about kate, the duchess of cambridge, and later turned up dead. in a letter to the radio station responsible, the hospital said in part, "to discover that not only had this happened but that the call had been prerecorded and the decision to transmit appr
offered a serious proceed proceeds albased on testimony of president clinton's former chief of staff. since then there's been no counter offer from the white house. instead reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. instead of reforming the tax code and cutting spending the president wants to raise tax rates. even if the president got the tax rate hike that he wanted, understand that we would continue to see trillion-dollar deficits for as far as the eye can see. listen, washington has got a spending problem not a revenue problem. if the president doesn't agree with our proposal i believe that he's got an obligation to families and small businesses to offer a plan of his own, a plan that can pass both chambers of the congress. we are ready and eager to talk to the president about such a plan. >> you did speak with the president earlier this week, can you characterize that call? did he have any kind of counter offer? also, we understand that he is making clear that it's got to be increase in rat
23 days before nhe deadline, when federal era le tax rates will revert to higher, clinton-era levels, a 2% ayroll tax cut will expire, and long-term unemployment benefits of dry up for over two million americans who have been out of work for six months or more. on friday, boehner did not rule hikea compromise on a tax hike for top earners, somewhere between today's 35% rate and the clinton-era's 39.6%. >> there are a lot of things ssat are possible to put the revenue the president seeks on the table. >> reporter: even if the two sides are making more progress behind the scenes, no one mit its them to admit it until of last minute. ederoffice of management and budget has asked all federal agencies to come up with a detailed list of possible cuts if there's no deal, maurice. >> dubois: nancy, thank you. t how is all this affecting the economy? the one sign we did see yesterday showed improvement. roe unemployment rate dipped to 7.7%, the lowest in four years. 146,000 jobs were created in spite of super storm sandy and the fiscal cliff threat. joining us now to talk more about that clif
is street to street, block to block, house to house, urban combat at its worst. hillary clinton says the events in syria are accelerating, and both sides are talking about some way to try to find some type of resolution to this war in syria that has lasted nearly two years long. russia a big supporter of the bashar al-assad, the russian foreign minister met with secretary clinton in bu dublin. she felt the meeting upbeat thinking there may be a come proeu myself in th compromise in the future. right now there is nothing concrete and syrians continue to die. >> reporter: with every step forward the opposition makes in syria it raises concerns that a cornered president bashar al-assad could be more likely to use those chemical weapons that are apparently loaded and ready to drop. lieutenant general tom mcnerney is a fox news military analyst and served as vice chief of staff of the united states air force. thanks so much for being here. intelligence reports suggest that bashar al-assad is making moves to putting together and readying these chemical weapons. you'll remember that preside
with secretary hillary clinton discussing the possibility of a syria without assad in power. >> wow. >> this morning rebels have declared damascus's airport a military target, warning civilians and airlines not to approach it. >> richard, that's what we're looking at. we're looking at russia to see when russia finally gives up on assad. if they are, in fact, coming close, it's over. he's done. >> that's the beginning of the end. and i think that's finally in play. brahimi who preceded kofi annan trying to do a diplomatic process finally, i think, has something to work with. it's the possibility of the threat that the syrian regime might turn to chemical munitions, and the russians realize that would be the equivalent of jumping and that their long-term equities. the russians realize that would be too far, not on moral grounds, but on real politic rounds. so the chances of telling the syrians don't do it, but the russians saying if you do it, you won't be supported. and possibly giving him a way out before he thinks -- before he makes the decision whether to do it. this has all come
. secretary of state clinton said this about the possible use of e emical weapons. >> this is a red line for the united states. i'm not going to telegraph in any specifics what we would do in the event of credible evidence that the assad regime has resorted to using chemical weapons against their own people but suffice it to say we are certainly planning to take action if that eventuality were to occur. >> reporter: seizing the chemical weapons and agents would require putting up to 75,000 troops on the ground. a massive operation that u.s. officials say is only likely to happen if and when assad falls. preventing assad from using his weapons would require air strikes against sights defended by russian-made anti-aircraft missiles. for now, the obama administration is backing up its public warnings by sending private messages to assad through one of his few remaining allies, russia. >> pelley: david, thank you. the assad dictatorship has ruled syria for more than 40 years. the syrian people rebelled last year and it's been open warfare ever since. it's extremely hazardous for reporters to
the president or either from secretary clinton or tony blair is, you know, they talk about the if. what then? any possible scenarios, possible action, i'm not hearing concrete scenarios, are you? >> well, you're not, brooke. i think for a very good reason. they want to stop this before it gets to that. nobody wants to have to strike at syrian chemical weapons plants. if you think about it logically, it is a very tough target. you have to know exactly where it is. you have to strike that hard enough to virtually incinerate all the chemical or biological material there before it escapes into the atmosphere. if those chemical weapons started to go on the move, in artillery shells or bombs, could you chase them all down? and, of course, in syria, much of this material is located or co-located in neighborhoods and towns with civilian populations. so you're putting civilian populations at risk. i think that's why you're hearing the very tough language from washington to nato headquarters. everybody wants this stopped before it even happens, brooke. >> talking about baer last hour, former cia, he s
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)